Polaroid of the Day


 

Too many books. The boxes are filled with books as well.   All my closets look like this. Shot with expired color film and a Polaroid One-Step.

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Find Your Community Treasures


bluebeardvonnegut

“…simply moderate giftedness has been made worthless by the printing press and radio and television and satellites and all that. A moderately gifted person who would have been a community treasure a thousand years ago has to give up, has to go into some other line of work, since modern communications put him or her into daily competition with nothing but world’s champions…. A moderately gifted person has to keep his or her gifts all bottled up until, in a manner of speaking, he or she gets drunk at a wedding and tap-dances on the coffee table like Fred Astaire or Ginger Rogers. We have a name for him or her. We call him or her an “exhibitionist.” How do we reward such an exhibitionist? We say to him or her the next morning, “Wow! Were you ever drunk last night!”

Everything Must Go. Who wants this book?


The Shipping News, by E. Annie Proulx, 1993shipping-news

Best novel I ever read that takes place in Newfoundland. Not a bad read.

Quote: “And it may be that love sometimes occurs without pain or misery.”

I’m still waiting to get back to the author on that one. She lives in the neighboring state, so I suppose I could stop by for tea sometime.

Send me your address, and I’ll send you the book. I’ll trust you to pay me back for the postage. Or you can donate to PAZ.

Amazon: When are you going to join the other 1,250 companies that pulled their ads from Breitbart?


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The Best Drumpf Could Do.

Like most of us, I’ve bought a fair amount of stuff from them. It’s convenient, right? Should I give up the convenience because Amazon is still advertising on a site that has essentially become an online gathering place for a very nasty and hate-filled mob?

A perusal of Breitbart.com shows that the boycott, whether it’s working or not, has certainly affected the look of the site. The only ads I saw were of the “Try This One Weird Trick to Restore Your Eyesight!” or “She Didn’t Realize That the Camera Was Watching!” type. Useless clickbait. No cars, no washing machines, no guitars, no floor cleaner, toilet paper, airlines, house paint, tires, etc. In short, nothing that I actually use.

This article from the Washington Post provides some flimsy verification that Breitbart is starting to hurt. If employees get laid off, whether because of a lack of revenue or they’ve been discovered endorsing pedophilia, morale is going to drop.

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Yes, this is a real ad from Breitbart.com

What I Threw Out Today: Notes from Veterinary School, a Photocopy of an Article, and an Italian Journal on Equine Medicine


I don’t know if my children will ever know what it was like to have to keep one’s information in hard copy. There were all those articles that one Ippologiaxeroxed just to have them handy. The walls of offices were filled with years of periodicals and journals, all because we were afraid that we’d have to refer to them.

Of course, I barely got around to reading a tenth of the stuff I ever copied, and in the day of the internet, they are just not worth keeping around. The information in these old things is still  probably good, for the most part, but it’s also been 15 years since I’ve treated a horse. IMG_1777

I liked keeping the Ippologia issue for sentimental reasons. I got it in Cremona, Italy (home of Stradivarius) when I was taking a course in veterinary acupuncture. I had a great time. The connections I made there lasted a while, but then they dissolved.

It happens. Radiology Notes II

 

 

 

 

What I Threw Out Today: The Organic Chemistry Textbook


The process continues.

I try to think of why I hang on to things.  My mind strains to think under what conditions I would actually need an organic chemistry textbook again. To be totally honest, I’m not sure why I needed to study organic chemistry in the first place. As a requirement for graduate school in chemistry, pharmacology, biochemistry, etc, it makes sense. To be a doctor? Most of us don’t remember anything about organic, except that we had to take it and a lot of people really hated it. ochem.jpg

I didn’t hate organic. I thought it was sort of interesting. I think I kept the book because 1) I thought that I might need it, though who knows for what, and 2) I hated the idea that after spending so much time studying something, it would all just go away. Could I get 5% right on those tests I took all those years ago? Why on earth did I spend all that time and treasure learning something the veterinary school admissions committee must have known I wouldn’t need and that I would almost certainly forget?

Lastly, I wonder whether somewhere this book wouldn’t be of use to somebody somewhere, in a place where there aren’t old textbooks piling up in landfills or being carted off to get recycled?

Veterinary Critical Care, by Sattler, Knowles and Whittick: Buy This Book!


from our filthy lucre department:

Enterotomy--what happens when your dog or cat eats the wrong thing
Enterotomy–what happens when your dog or cat eats the wrong thing

We now interrupt your regular Meta-Bug for this important message.

WRITTEN IN 1981,

This was one of the first books written on veterinary emergency medicine and critical care. Naturally, quite a bit of it is out of date, most notably in the absence of newer pharmaceuticals and the presence of older equipment, some of it already looking rather quaint, like something you might find at a flea market.

However, the general thrust of the book, in terms of what types of cases you might see, how to approach a case, and how to keep records, is still pretty much spot-on.  The chapters are written by different authors (I saw a quote from an article by my old surgery professor, Eb Rosin, zikhrono livrakha, lost to ALS not long after my graduation from my veterinary school).

But as you may have noted from my earlier posts on moving, I have too much stuff, and most of that excess is in books.

I’m moving to Peru for half a year, come December. the nonprofit we started last year, PAZ (Pan American Zoonotic Research and Prevention) needs someone to be on the spot, so I’m going. We have no very little funding at this point. Therefore,  I need to 1) dump stuff, and 2) raise money.

So buy this book!  Even if you’re not a veterinarian, but just someone interested in science and veterinary medicine and animals, you will find this interesting. 100% of your purchase will go to supporting PAZ.

Here is the eBay link.

 

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